Explore Collections Explore The Collections
You are here: CollectionsOnline  /  Plaiting the crown of thorns on Our Lord's head, stained glass panel, school of Jan de Caumont, Netherlandish, 17th century
top left corner
top right corner
bottom left corner
bottom right corner
image SG115

Plaiting the crown of thorns on Our Lord's head, stained glass panel, school of Jan de Caumont, Netherlandish, 17th century

Clear glass with brown paint and yellow stains with blue and green enamels, pot metal flashed ruby is used for the tormentor’s breeches

Height: 570mm
Width: 455mm

Museum number: SG115

Curatorial note

In this larger panel Christ sits quietly on a dais while his tormentors surround him; his hands are bound with cords and the crown of thorns is on his head. To one side a soldier brandishes a spiked club and on the other a man holds a rod with which they press the thorns. A man kneels before Christ and mocks him. To the right are three soldiers, one with a spear, and a spear lies on the chequered floor in the foreground. On the far left a robed and turbaned figure holding a briar leans on a balustrade and points to Christ, and behind him is a band of soldiers carrying spears. The scene takes place before the large archway of a massive stone building.

The panel is constructed of several pieces leaded together. The upper section is composed of three regular rectangles but below these a piece of flashed ruby glass has been inserted as the tormentor’s breeches. The figure of Christ is on a separate insert and there are also repair leads. SG124, The Scourging of Christ is constructed in a similar way and may be a companion piece (it was certainly regarded as such by Soane). The clearly articulated bodies, the tripartite rendering of the knees, the strongly characterised faces and bright colours are characteristics of the school of Jan de Caumont, whose workshop is responsible for several panels constructed in a similar way and now in American collections, at Yale University Art Gallery and the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

Popham suggested the design might be after Pieter Crabeth, possibly because of the Roman costume of the soldiers.

Literature

P. V. Maes, ’Oud Leuvens Brandglass in Engeland’, Arca Lovaniensis 1 (1972):189-201
Catalogue of the Stained Glass in Sir John Soane's Museum, Special Issue of the Journal of Stained Glass 2004, pp 252-253


If you have any further information about this object, please contact us: worksofart@soane.org.uk