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Model of a Primitive Hut in a more advanced state, explaining principle of construction, wood

Height: 23cm
Width: 25.5cm
Depth: 42.7cm

Museum number: SC1

Curatorial note

Bailey’s Inventory entry for M1298 reads: ‘Model of a Primitive Hut shewing the probable origin of the several members of the Cornice & the orders of Architecture’. That for SC1 reads: ‘Small Model explanatory of the principle of Construction supposed to have been adopted in the Primitive Huts, and the origin of the several Members of the Orders of Architecture’. SC1 shows the Hut in a more advanced state of development than M1298, and is the more finished model.

Soane illustrated his R.A. Lectures with drawings and models (see Introductory to Lecture I, p 16: ‘I trust that all defects, whether in language and arrangement, or in the drawings and models, will be imputed, not to any want of zeal and application on my part, but to the difficulty and extent of the task I have undertaken’.) Lecture I in the series dealt with the early development of Greek architecture and it was for this talk that these models would have been made: ‘ A few trees, placed perpendicularly in the ground, and others laid across, formed the outsides and roof, and , like the former, were covered with reeds and clay. The roof being laid nearly flat soon admitted the weather. This inconvenience once felt, the active powers of the human mind soon suggested the idea of a more elevated or pointed roof, in which the origin of the Pediment, as well as other constituent parts of the succeeding Architecture of the Greeks, is easy to be seen’ (p22 of Sir John Soane’s Lectures of Architecture, edited by Bolton 1929).


If you have any further information about this object, please contact us: worksofart@soane.org.uk