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You are here: CollectionsOnline  /  The principles of painting, under the heads of anatomy attitude accident ... In which is contained, an account of the Athenian, Roman, Venetian and Flemish schools. To which is added, the balance of painters. Being the names of the most noted painters, and their degrees of perfection in the four principal parts of their art: of singular use to those who would form an idea of the value of paintings and pictures. Written originally in French by Mons. Du Piles, ... And now first translated into English. By a painter.
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PILES, Roger de (1635--1709)
[Cours de peinture par principes. English]
The principles of painting, under the heads of anatomy attitude accident ... In which is contained, an account of the Athenian, Roman, Venetian and Flemish schools. To which is added, the balance of painters. Being the names of the most noted painters, and their degrees of perfection in the four principal parts of their art: of singular use to those who would form an idea of the value of paintings and pictures. Written originally in French by Mons. Du Piles, ... And now first translated into English. By a painter.
London: printed for J. Osborn, 1743.
xii, 300, [8] p., II pl. ; 19.6 cm. (8º)

Translation of Cours de peinture par principes, first published Paris 1708 (q.v.). On the title page, 'Under the Heads of Anatomy Attitude Accident Architecture Composition Claro-Obscuro Contrast Colouring Design Disposition Draperies Expression Harmony History Invention Landskip Lights Proportion Passion Portraiture Sculpture Style Truth Unity, &c.' is laid out in four columns each of six lines. This is the final and perhaps most widely-read work of Roger de Piles, an amateur painter, friend of painters, and spy for Louis XIV in Holland, best known for his writings on art published during the years 1668–1708. De Piles asserted that the success of a painting could be measured by the immediacy of its impression regardless of the subject matter, analogous to the impact of music on mood. It is clear from Soane's notes made in 1806 that he sought to transfer de Piles's doctrines from painting to architecture. (See Watkin, pp. 189-190, 699; Soane Case 161/4.) Page 184 misnumbered 284. ESTC t10569.

Copy Notes Inscribed in ink on front free-endpaper John Soane; with page numbers noted in pencil on rear free-endpaper and occasional pencil markings in the margins. Bought from Josiah Taylor for 7s. on 1 December 1804. (Archive 7/3/4).

Binding C18th sprinkled calf, gilt double-rule borders, red spine-label.

Reference Number 3041


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