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ARCHITECTS' CLUB (London)
Resolutions of the Associated Architects, with the report of a committee by them appointed to consider the causes of the frequent fires, and the best means of preventing the like in future.
[London], [1793].
78, [2] p. ; 20.2 cm. (8º)

The introduction is dated 'London, July 26, 1793.' The 'Committee' consisted of 'the whole Club' (see p. [11]), the members of which are listed on p. [v] as 'Robert Brettingham [junior], Joseph Bonomi, John Carr, Sir William Chambers, S.P. Cockerell, George Dance [the younger], Thomas Hardwick, Henry Holland, Richard Jepp [i.e. Jupp], James Lewis, Robert Mylne, James Payne [i.e. Paine], Nicholas Rivett [i.e. Revett], Thomas Sandby, John Soane, James Wyatt, [and] John Yenn, Esquires'. 'Appendix I' contains the 3rd Earl Stanhope's paper on lathe and plaster fire-proofing, which had been read at a meeting of the Royal Society on 2 July 1778 and first published in the Philosophical Transactions, vol. 68, part 2. Appendix 'No. II' records tests conducted in 1792 on the effectiveness of David Hartley's 'fire plates', Mahon's lathe and plaster interlining, and Henry Wood's 'liquid security' composition in fires deliberately started at two new houses lent for the purpose by Richard Holland at Nos 5 & 10 Hans Place. Although the committee's report, which is signed by Henry Holland and dated 'London, January 3d, 1793', comes out in favour of Hartley's fire plates as the most effective method where maximum security against fire is needed, a footnote on pp. 25--26 commends the 'Arches of Cones' manufactured by 'Mr. Morris, at Child's Hill, near London', noting that the 'advantage arising from the use of [pottery] Cones, when compared with Bricks, is their superior lightness, (being twice the bulk and only half the weight), and their being applicable to Arches of a very small radius.' Soane later fell out with other members of the Club over the issue of whether architects should charge a commission for measuring work. See Gillian Darley, John Soane: an accidental romantic (London 1999), pp. 124-6. ESTC t109613; BAL, Early printed books, no. 122.

Copy Notes Copy 1: With MS. corrections in ink on pp. [v], 15, 22, 26, 60, and 64. Bound last in a collection of pamphlets.
Copy 2: 19.8 cm. Imperfect; wanting the half-title. With MS. corrections in ink on pp. [v], 15, 22, 26, 60, and 64. Bound first in a collection of pamphlets on fire prevention, including another edition of the same work incorporating the corrections (q.v.).

Binding Copy 1: C19th half maroon roan, blind double-rule borders, marbled-paper boards, gilt double-ruled spine, gilt-lettered 'Letter to / B. West P.R.A.'. Numbered '93' in a series of pamphlet volumes.
Copy 2: Late 18th-century half sprinkled calf, marbled-paper boards, gilt double-rule spine, red morocco spine-label lettered 'Fires'. Half bound by Edward Lawrence for 1s. 6d., 1802. (Spiers Box). Later numbered '98' in a series of pamphlet volumes.

Reference Number 3953


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