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You are here: CollectionsOnline  /  Some considerations upon the question, whether the Parliament is dissolved by it's prorogation for 15 months? The two statutes upon which this question depends are, 4. Edvv. 3. cap. 14. Item it is accorded, That a Parliament shall be holden every year once, and more often if need be. 36. Edvv. 3. cap. 10. Item for maintenance of the said articles and statutes, and redress of divers mischiefs and grievances vvhich daily happen, a Parliament shall be holden every year. As another time vvas ordained by another statute.
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SOME CONSIDERATIONS ...
Some considerations upon the question, whether the Parliament is dissolved by it's prorogation for 15 months? The two statutes upon which this question depends are, 4. Edvv. 3. cap. 14. Item it is accorded, That a Parliament shall be holden every year once, and more often if need be. 36. Edvv. 3. cap. 10. Item for maintenance of the said articles and statutes, and redress of divers mischiefs and grievances vvhich daily happen, a Parliament shall be holden every year. As another time vvas ordained by another statute.
[London]: printed in the year, 1676.
26, [2] p. ; 19.5 cm. (4º)

Anonymous. Place of publication taken from Wing. An anonymous dissolutionist tract that has been attributed to Nicholas Carey and also to Lord Holles, but there is no evidence that it was written by either of them. See Journals of the House of Lords, 1 March 1677 (q.v..; date accessed: 27 March 2012). The final leaf is blank. This pamphlet and another of the same year titled The Long Parliament dissolved (q.v.; date accessed: 27 March 2012) were condemned to be burnt by the common hangman on 7 March (q.v.). The title-page of the Soane copy is inscribed in ink Shaftsbury, presumably an attribution to Anthony Ashley Cooper, 1st Earl of Shaftesbury (1621--1683), the author of A letter from a person of quality, printed anonymously in November 1675 (q.v.). The present pamphlet repeats the case made by the linen draper Francis Jenks in a speech at the Guildhall on 24 June 1676, arguing that two statutes from the reign of Edward III requiring that Parliament sit every year meant that King Charles II's prorogation of Parliament on 22 November 1675 until 15 February 1677 (meaning no session would be held in 1676 at all) signified the ipso facto dissolution of Parliament. When Parliament reconvened, Shaftesbury and his fellow dissolutionists Buckingham, Salisbury, and Wharton refused to apologize for contempt of Parliament and were consequently imprisoned in the Tower of London. ESTC r3362; Wing H2467.

Copy Notes Bound (2) in a collection of 14 English political tracts relating to parliament with imprint dates between 1673 and 1682, inscribed in ink on the front pastedown Lee Warner, prossibly the same, contemporary hand as the manuscript attribution to Shaftesbury. Title-page inscribed in ink at the foot of the title: in: ye long Parl: dissolued p: 8, and text underscored and annotated in the same hand. The final blank leaf has been torn leaving only a stub.

Binding C17th sheep, blind-tooled borders and centre lozenge, later paper spine-label lettered in ink 'Parliament 1676' and octagonal paper library shelf-label lettered '102'.

Reference Number 179


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