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MALTHUS, Thomas Robert (1766--1834)
An essay on the principle of population; or, a view of its past and present effects on human happiness; with an inquiry into our prospects respecting the future removal or mitigation of the evils which it occasions. By T.R. Malthus, ... In two volumes. ... The third edition.
London: printed for J. Johnson, by T. Bensley, 1806.
2 vols ; 21.1 cm.
I: xvi, 505, [61] p.
II: vii, [1], 559, [1] p.

First published anonymously in 1798 and greatly expanded for the second edition of 1803, Malthus's theory that population growth will always tend to outstrip food production leading to checks on growth in the form of "vices" and "miseries" causing increased death or reduced birth rates was radical in challenging the eighteenth-century conviction that increases in population were invariably beneficial. Despised by many contemporaries for his grim portrayal of the social and moral consequences of overpopulation and often misrepresented, Malthus was nevertheless influential on Darwin's development of his theory of natural selection. Index to both volumes in Vol. I.

Copy Notes Imperfect; wanting half-titles to both volumes.

Binding C19th calf, gilt roll-tooled borders, gilt double-ruled spines, red morocco spine-labels. Bound by Edwin Hutchinson for 5s. 8d., 3 November 1829. (Archives 7/10/19).

Reference Number 207


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