Explore Collections Explore The Collections
You are here: CollectionsOnline  /  The historical, political, and literary register, containing an account of every public transaction and remarkable production necessary to illustrate the history, literature, or public amusements of the year 1769. To be continued annually. Vol. I.
top left corner
top right corner
bottom left corner
bottom right corner
Image Not Yet Available
THE HISTORICAL, POLITICAL, AND LITERARY REGISTER ...
The historical, political, and literary register, containing an account of every public transaction and remarkable production necessary to illustrate the history, literature, or public amusements of the year 1769. To be continued annually. Vol. I.
London: printed by S. Bladon, 1770.
88, 97--168; 307, [5] p. ; 20.1 cm. (8º)

Volume I only; no more known to have been published. In two parts, each with separate pagination and register. Page 88 of first part is numbered 88--96 to complete the section and is followed by p. 97. There was also a Dublin edition with the imprint of James Potts (see R.S. Crane and F.B. Kaye, A census of British newspapers and periodicals, 1620--1800, Chapel Hill 1927, no. 1420). Divided into topic sections: state papers, historical state of Europe, judicial articles, theatrical register, poetry, anecdotes, antiquities, and miscellanies. With a complete diary of London theatrical and operatic performances for the year. ESTC t135945.

Copy Notes Soane took notes from one of the poems in the 'New Annual Register 1769' while preparing the second course of his RA Lectures. The poem is an anonymous 'Ode for His Majesty's Birth-Day, June 4, 1769' (pp. 97--99, second sequence), addressing the King as 'Patron of Arts!': '... the wanderer, shall be taught, That nothing truly great was ever wrought Where judgment was away. ...', and calling for 'studious youth [to] repair, Beneath their King's protecting care, To every clime which art has known; And rich with spoils from every coast Return, till Albion learn to boast An Athens of her own.' (Archives 1/242/4). The passage is not quoted in the lecture but is in keeping with Soane's doctrine of appropriate character in architecture and his call for the building of public monuments in England. See David Watkin, Sir John Soane: Enlightenment thought and the Royal Academy Lectures (Cambridge 1996), pp. 357--60 and Soane's Lecture VII, pp. 580--93.

Binding C19th calf, gilt-ruled borders and spine, black morocco spine-labels reading 'Annual Register' and 'Vol. I. 1769'.

Reference Number 280


If you have any further information about this book,
please contact us:

books@soane.org.uk