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You are here: CollectionsOnline  /  A new method for valuing of annuities upon lives. Shewing at sight, as follows: I. How many years, months, &c. purchase an annuity upon life for any age, from 30 to 73 years, is worth, when money yields 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8 per cent. interest. II. How much a year 100 l. is worth upon life for any of the aforesaid ages, &c. III. How many years an annuitant must live to receive the value of the money sunk. IV. The value of the buyers and sellers chances. V. The present value of any annuity upon life, from 1000 l. a year, to one pound a year for any age, from 30 to 73 years, when money is worth 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8 per cent. VI. How many years, months, &c. purchase, leaseholds are worth for any certain number of years under 100, at 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 per cent. per annum. VII. The annuity that 100 l. is worth, if laid out upon leaseholds; very useful for valuing of buildings and fines. VIII. The increase of 100 l. at 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12 per cent. per ann. IX. The decrease of 100 l. at 4, 5, 6 and 7 per cent. per annum; very useful for valuing of fines, payable at certain terms of years in lease. X. The amount of 100 l. a year, if the payment is forborn for any number of years, under 31, at 5 and 6 per cent. Very useful in settling of accounts between executors and orphans. Together with many useful examples and instructions for valuing of single lives; two or more lives; lives taken in with other lives; reversion of lives; annuities in expectation; estates for any certain term of years, as freeholds, leaseholds and reversions, without any decimals, &c. The whole being made easy to a common capacity. By Richard Hayes. The second edition, corrected.
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HAYES, Richard
[A new method for valuing of annuities upon lives. 1746]
A new method for valuing of annuities upon lives. Shewing at sight, as follows: I. How many years, months, &c. purchase an annuity upon life for any age, from 30 to 73 years, is worth, when money yields 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8 per cent. interest. II. How much a year 100 l. is worth upon life for any of the aforesaid ages, &c. III. How many years an annuitant must live to receive the value of the money sunk. IV. The value of the buyers and sellers chances. V. The present value of any annuity upon life, from 1000 l. a year, to one pound a year for any age, from 30 to 73 years, when money is worth 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8 per cent. VI. How many years, months, &c. purchase, leaseholds are worth for any certain number of years under 100, at 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 per cent. per annum. VII. The annuity that 100 l. is worth, if laid out upon leaseholds; very useful for valuing of buildings and fines. VIII. The increase of 100 l. at 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12 per cent. per ann. IX. The decrease of 100 l. at 4, 5, 6 and 7 per cent. per annum; very useful for valuing of fines, payable at certain terms of years in lease. X. The amount of 100 l. a year, if the payment is forborn for any number of years, under 31, at 5 and 6 per cent. Very useful in settling of accounts between executors and orphans. Together with many useful examples and instructions for valuing of single lives; two or more lives; lives taken in with other lives; reversion of lives; annuities in expectation; estates for any certain term of years, as freeholds, leaseholds and reversions, without any decimals, &c. The whole being made easy to a common capacity. By Richard Hayes. The second edition, corrected.
London: printed for W. Meadows, 1746.
[8], 128 p. : tables ; 21.8 cm. (4º)

First edition 1727 (q.v.). Chiefly tables. Woodcut headpieces. With an initial leaf of advertisements for five other books by the same author available from W. Meadows. Page 12 misnumbered 4. ESTC t101453.

Copy Notes Inscribed front free-endpaper in ink on John Soane / 1815 and in pencil =s1= with bookseller's hieroglyph, probably Thomas Boone's. Earlier cypher in ink on front pastedown. Inscribed on title-page in ink Danvers Osborn 1747, possibly Sir Danvers Osborn of Chicksands, Bedfordshire, the son of John Osborn and Sarah Byng, daughter of George Byng, 1st Viscount Torrington, and sister of Admiral John Byng. After three years as MP for Bedfordshire, 1747--1750, Osborn went to Nova Scotia where he was a member of the Nova Scotia Council, and was made governor of New York in 1753 a few months before his death, possibly by suicide. (See Dictionary of Canadian Biography.)

Binding C18th sprinkled calf, gilt double-ruled borders and spine, red spine-label.

Reference Number 531


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