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You are here: CollectionsOnline  /  A discovery of a new world, or, a discourse tending to prove that 'tis probable there may be another habitable world in the moon. With discourse concerning the probability of a passage thither. Unto which is added, a discourse concerning a new planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the planets. In two parts. By John Wilkins, ... The fourth edition corrected and amended.
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WILKINS, John (1614--1672)
A discovery of a new world, or, a discourse tending to prove that 'tis probable there may be another habitable world in the moon. With discourse concerning the probability of a passage thither. Unto which is added, a discourse concerning a new planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the planets. In two parts. By John Wilkins, ... The fourth edition corrected and amended.
London: printed by T.M. & J.A. for John Gillibrand [i.e. Gellibrand], 1684.
[16], 95, ['66' i.e. 1], 93--187, [1]; [8], 184 p. : add. engr. t.-pl., wdcut illus. ; 17.7 cm. (8º)

The work is an expanded version of The discovery of a world in the moone, originally published in 1638 (STC 25640); the second part was added to the third impression in 1640 (STC 25641). Added engraved title-plate reads 'A Discourse concerning A New world & Another Planet In 2 Bookes. London, Printed for Iohn Gellibrand at the Golden ball in St. Paul's Church yard 1683' The second book has separate pagination and register, and a special title-page with imprint 'Printed by J. D. for J. Gellibrand, ... 1684', reading: A discourse concerning a new planet, tending to prove that 'tis probable our Earth is one of the planets. Among the author's fantastic speculations in this work, he explores the sensational notion that one day man may reach the moon. Addressed to the common reader, the primary aim was to make known and to defend the new world picture of Copernicus, Keppler, and Galileo by showing its agreement with reason and experience against subservience to Aristotelian doctrines and literal biblical interpretation. Wing 2186; ESTC r1155.

Copy Notes Bought from Edward Lawrence for 2s. 6d., 22 January 1803. (Archives 7/4/9). Inscribed in ink on title-page John Soane / 1803. Earlier inscription in ink on front free-endpaper: For Bryan Norbury February / the Ninth Day one Thousand six / hundred eighty eight; with doodles of planets in orbit; further inscription in ink on verso of engraved title-leaf Bry Norbury with smudges; calligraphic illustration on verso rear free-endpaper.

Binding C17th mottled calf, later red morocco spine-label, marbled edges.

Reference Number 560


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