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image Image 1 for SM (1) 64/4/64 verso (2) 64/4/64 recto (3) 64/4/63 recto (4) 64/4/62 (5) 64/4/63 verso
image Image 2 for SM (1) 64/4/64 verso (2) 64/4/64 recto (3) 64/4/63 recto (4) 64/4/62 (5) 64/4/63 verso
image Image 3 for SM (1) 64/4/64 verso (2) 64/4/64 recto (3) 64/4/63 recto (4) 64/4/62 (5) 64/4/63 verso
image Image 4 for SM (1) 64/4/64 verso (2) 64/4/64 recto (3) 64/4/63 recto (4) 64/4/62 (5) 64/4/63 verso
  • image Image 1 for SM (1) 64/4/64 verso (2) 64/4/64 recto (3) 64/4/63 recto (4) 64/4/62 (5) 64/4/63 verso
  • image Image 2 for SM (1) 64/4/64 verso (2) 64/4/64 recto (3) 64/4/63 recto (4) 64/4/62 (5) 64/4/63 verso
  • image Image 3 for SM (1) 64/4/64 verso (2) 64/4/64 recto (3) 64/4/63 recto (4) 64/4/62 (5) 64/4/63 verso
  • image Image 4 for SM (1) 64/4/64 verso (2) 64/4/64 recto (3) 64/4/63 recto (4) 64/4/62 (5) 64/4/63 verso

Reference number

SM (1) 64/4/64 verso (2) 64/4/64 recto (3) 64/4/63 recto (4) 64/4/62 (5) 64/4/63 verso

Purpose

Working drawings (copies), close to as executed, for the stables, 1790-1 (5 on 3 sheets)

Aspect

1 Plan of the Foundations 2 Plan of the Ground Floor marked A to E 3 Plan of Hayloft floor 4 Elevations A (external) and B (from yard) 5 External elevations C, D and E

Scale

1-5 bar scales of 1/5 inch to one foot

Inscribed

1-5, as above John (or J.) Wharton Esqr, Stables at Skelton Castle, Copy and running dimensions given

Signed and dated

1-5 datable to 1790-1. Evidently, the drawings were copies made c. April-June 1791. The date of the originals is uncertain for there is only one reference to the stables in Soane's Ledger B (p.122) 'Making three drawings of designs for the Stables / Coachouses &c one of which was approved' dated 27 December 1790.

Medium and dimensions

(1-2) Pen, pricked for transfer on laid paper with one fold mark (533 x 645) (3) pen, light red and yellow washes, pricked for transfer on laid paper with one fold mark (537 x 639) (4) pen and wash, pricked for transfer on laid paper with one fold mark (536 x 641) (5) pen and wash, some pricking for transfer on laid paper with one fold mark (537 x 639)

Hand

1-5 Frederick Meyer (pupil April 1791-1796) and William Blogg (improver March-June 1791) (comparison of hands with drawings 8-10)

Notes

These five copies of a set of plans and elevations/sections for the stables at Skelton Castle are drawn on three sheets (lacking are three of the elevations for the fronts facing the stable yard). They show a quadrangular building with external dimensions of '158..0' by '105..4'; internally, the yard measures '114..4' by approximately 61 feet 4 inches. The plan is symmetrical with a five-bay entrance front 'A' attached by segmental-headed arches (11 feet wide) to the side ranges labelled 'D' and 'E' that lead into the range labelled 'B' and 'C'. The stableyard was entered at 'A' via the twin, segmental-headed arches between which were three coach-houses '17..4' wide and with large double doors. Up to 36 horses were housed in stalls in the three other wings; innovatory loose boxes were generally only introduced from about 1798 (Worsley, op.cit, p.185). The wing labelled 'B' and 'C' is fronted on the yard side ('B') by a three-part Doric entrance beneath a blind, segmental arch. Overall, this entrance is '24..10' wide, with the centre '11..6' wide, the side entrances '4..10' wide and the columns '1..6' in diameter' (as shown on the ground floor plan, drawing 2). In execution, the entrance was modified so that the Doric columns were omitted and a wide segmental-arched opening with flank walls with doors was set some feet in from the wall plane. On Soane's plan (drawing 2) the entrance leads to a stair, store, stalls and beyond these is a ride that is '154..6' long and '14..2' wide and with a good range of lunette windows to the outside.

Giles Worsley (op.cit. p.283) defines a 'covered ride' as 'a long straight enclosed space usually with a turning area at the end' that with riding houses and maneges (covered exercising rings) can be described as riding schools though they are each a separate building type. 'The earliest covered rides ... were long, thin structures placed generally at the rear of the quadrangle in which the horse could be trotted up to one end and then back again. John Soane was particularly keen on rides, incorporating them in his designs for stables for Mulgrave Castle, Yorkshire, of 1780, Skelton Castle, Yorskshire, of 1787, Lees Court, Kent, of 1789-90 and Tyringham, Buckinghamshire, of 1793' (op.cit., pp.198-9, fig.192, photograph).

Literature

G. Worsley, The British stable, 2004, pp. 198-9, 283

Level

Drawing

Digitisation of the Drawings Collection has been made possible through the generosity of the Leon Levy Foundation

If you have any further information about this object, please contact us: drawings@soane.org.uk

Sir John Soane's collection includes some 30,000 architectural, design and topographical drawings which is a very important resource for scholars worldwide. His was the first architect’s collection to attempt to preserve the best in design for the architectural profession in the future, and it did so by assembling as exemplars surviving drawings by great Renaissance masters and by the leading architects in Britain in the 17th and 18th centuries and his near contemporaries such as Sir William Chambers, Robert Adam and George Dance the Younger. These drawings sit side by side with 9,000 drawings in Soane’s own hand or those of the pupils in his office, covering his early work as a student, his time in Italy and the drawings produced in the course of his architectural practice from 1780 until the 1830s.

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