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You are here: CollectionsOnline  /  Imaginative reconstruction drawings of designs for a Triumphal Bridge: that is: design submitted to the Parma Academy, 1780; design not submitted to the Parma Academy, 1779-80 and Royal Academy Gold Medal design, 1776 made by J.M.Gandy, May-July 1799 (3)
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Reference number

SM 12/5/5, 12/5/6, P258 (framed: North Drawing Room: south wall, lhs inside plane)

Purpose

Imaginative reconstruction drawings of designs for a Triumphal Bridge: that is: design submitted to the Parma Academy, 1780; design not submitted to the Parma Academy, 1779-80 and Royal Academy Gold Medal design, 1776 made by J.M.Gandy, May-July 1799 (3)

Aspect

(16) Bird's eye view of the Parma Academy design for a Triumphal Bridge
(17) Perspective drawn from a low riverside viewpoint of a design for a triumphal bridge with 7 arches and simple river stairs. It has an uninterrupted parapet (except for some statues) and the central dome is minimized while the staccato rhythm of fluted Greek Doric columns (2424248424242) set between antae is emphasised
(18) Perspective from one side of a river of the Royal Academy Gold Medal competition design of 1776, probably exhibited at the Royal Academy, 1806

Signed and dated

(18) July 19th 1799

Medium and dimensions

(16) Pen, burnt umber, blue, green and sepia washes, watercolour technique, shaded, minor pricking through for transfer, within triple ruled and sepia wash border (17) pen, burnt umber, blue, pink, green and sepia washes, watercolour technique, shaded, within triple ruled and sepia wash border (18) pen, burnt umber, blue, green and sepia washes, watercolour technique, shaded, within triple ruled and sepia and black wash border (16,17) on wove paper 639 x 968, 634 x 971, 702 x 1237 framed

Hand

J.M.Gandy (1771-1843)

Watermark

(16,17) 1794 J Whatman (18) n.a. framed

Notes

Between May and June 1799 the office Day Book includes the following entries by Gandy: 'Perspective view of a Bridge' (between 18 May and 4 June, 16 working days, drawing 16); 'Abt Bridge' (between 5 and 8 June, 4 working days, drawing 17) and (from 10 June to 19 July, 17 working days and definitely drawing 18) 'Perspective View of a Triumphal Bridge'. Thus it is assumed that drawings 16-18 were made in that period and in that sequence. Though four days seems insufficient time for drawing 17 ( 'Abt Bridge), it is the least complicated drawing since it mostly shows one side of the bridge to the river. With its severe, 'stripped' Doric monumentality, lit by a softly luminous sunset and with a violet-shadowed river, it is also the most arresting of the two perspectives.

The design (drawing 17) rejected by Soane for submission to the Parma Academy was based on drawings of which only the plan (drawing 7) now survives. While drawing 7 closely follows the simpler scheme A of George Dance's plan (6a, left-hand side), neither of the alternative elevations, A1 or A2, are readily seen in Gandy's perspective though A2 (right-hand side) has a rather severe colonnade. Soane exhibited a 'Design for a triumphal bridge, for which the diploma of the Academy of Parma was given' (drawing 14, q.v.) and 'Design for a triumphal bridge' (drawing 15, q.v.) at the Royal Academy in 1799. However, the annual exhibition was always opened on 23 April which rules out the drawings catalogued here. The next time that Soane exhibited a 'Design for a triumphal bridge' at the R.A. was in 1806 and that was probably (the framed) drawing 18.

Level

Drawing

Digitisation of the Drawings Collection has been made possible through the generosity of the Leon Levy Foundation

If you have any further information about this object, please contact us: drawings@soane.org.uk

Sir John Soane's collection includes some 30,000 architectural, design and topographical drawings which is a very important resource for scholars worldwide. His was the first architect’s collection to attempt to preserve the best in design for the architectural profession in the future, and it did so by assembling as exemplars surviving drawings by great Renaissance masters and by the leading architects in Britain in the 17th and 18th centuries and his near contemporaries such as Sir William Chambers, Robert Adam and George Dance the Younger. These drawings sit side by side with 9,000 drawings in Soane’s own hand or those of the pupils in his office, covering his early work as a student, his time in Italy and the drawings produced in the course of his architectural practice from 1780 until the 1830s.

Browse (via the vertical menu to the left) and search results for Drawings include a mixture of Concise catalogue records – drawn from an outline list of the collection – and fuller records where drawings have been catalogued in more detail (an ongoing process).