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You are here: CollectionsOnline  /  British education: or, the source of the disorders of Great Britain. Being an essay towards proving, that the immorality, ignorance, and false taste, which so generally prevail, are the natural and necessary consequences of the present defective system of education. With an attempt to shew, that a revival of the art of speaking, and the study of our own language, might contribute, in a great measure, to the cure of those evils. In three parts. I. Of the use of these studies to religion, and morality; as also, to the support of the British constitution. II. Their absolute necessity in order to refine, ascertain, and fix the English language. III. Their use in the cultivation of the imitative arts: shewing, that were the study of oratory made a necessary branch of the education of youth; poetry, musick, painting, and sculpture, might arrive at as high a pitch of perfection in England, as ever they did in Athens or Rome. By Thomas Sheridan, A.M.
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SHERIDAN, Thomas (1719--1788)
British education: or, the source of the disorders of Great Britain. Being an essay towards proving, that the immorality, ignorance, and false taste, which so generally prevail, are the natural and necessary consequences of the present defective system of education. With an attempt to shew, that a revival of the art of speaking, and the study of our own language, might contribute, in a great measure, to the cure of those evils. In three parts. I. Of the use of these studies to religion, and morality; as also, to the support of the British constitution. II. Their absolute necessity in order to refine, ascertain, and fix the English language. III. Their use in the cultivation of the imitative arts: shewing, that were the study of oratory made a necessary branch of the education of youth; poetry, musick, painting, and sculpture, might arrive at as high a pitch of perfection in England, as ever they did in Athens or Rome. By Thomas Sheridan, A.M.
London: printed for R. and J. Dodsley, 1756.
[2], xl, 536 p.; 20.5 cm. (8º)

The author was an actor, the son of a schoolmaster and father of the playright Richard Brinsley Sheridan, best known for his comedy The school for scandal (French translation, q.v.). 'A treatise of fundamental importance for the history of English studies and the teaching of English, discussing all aspects of language-study, including grammar, rhetoric and elocution' - Alston. Price from half-title: 'Price bound Six Shillings.'. ESTC t90531; Alston X, 22; CBEL II, 1920.

Copy Notes Bought from Thomas Boone for 1s. 6d., 24 November 1808. (Spiers Box). Boone's price and code inscribed in pencil on the front free-endpaper. Soane's spade-shield bookplate is pasted down over the earlier spade-shield bookplate with floral garland of Ro[bert] Ca[nn?].

Binding C18th sprinkled calf, gilt double-rule borders and spine, paper spine-label with title in ink.

Reference Number 757


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